UF Department of Chemical Engineering Awards Term Professorships (UF Department of Chemical Engineering)

UF Department of Chemical Engineering Awards Term Professorships

Four members of University of Florida‘s Department of Chemical Engineering at the Herbert Wertheim College of Engineering were selected for the department’s term professorships.

Helena Hagelin-Weaver, Ph.D., an associate professor, was selected to receive the Dr. and Mrs. Frederick C. Edie Term Professorship in Chemical Engineering for the 2021-2024 period. The Hagelin-Weaver Research Group works on heterogeneous catalyst development and fundamental understanding of these catalysts at the atomic level. Their main research focus is on environmentally friendly, energy-related reactions.

Whitney L. Stoppel, Ph.D., an assistant professor, was selected to receive the William P. and Tracy Cirioli Term Professorship in Chemical Engineering for the 2021-2024 period. The Stoppel Lab builds dynamic and adaptable natural biomaterials that can be leveraged to alter the behavior of cells both in vitro and in vivo for the repair and rehabilitation of damaged or diseased tissue.

Professor Jason F. Weaver, Ph.D., was selected to receive the Dow Chemical Company Foundation Term Professorship in Chemical Engineering for 2021-2024. The Weaver Group focuses on advancing the understanding of reactions occurring on solid surfaces on a molecular level. Such reactions are fundamental to heterogeneous catalysis and semiconductor processing yet remain poorly understood at the molecular level. They investigate surface chemical reactions using analysis methods based on ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) surface chemistry and physics as well as in situ techniques.

Kirk J. Ziegler, Ph.D., a professor and Associate Chair for Graduate Studies, was selected to receive the Charles A. Stokes Endowed Professorship in Chemical Engineering for 2021-2024. The Zeigler Research Group focuses on developing a fundamental understanding of interfaces in nanoscale systems, which can have far-reaching implications for various fields of nanotechnology. Their goal is to manipulate interfaces to dictate the nanostructures that are fabricated and to control reactions and transport at the surface of the nanostructures. Once the interfaces can be controlled and manipulated, it is possible to fabricate nanomaterials with novel functionality, improving their integration and performance in several applications.

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